did you know? faq's

Facts about Stone Ground Flour

Does your recipe call for all-purpose flour?
Simply mix the Mill’s bread and pastry flour together at a 1:1 ratio. So if a cookie recipe calls for 2 cups of all-purpose flour, simply use 1 cup of bread flour and 1 cup of pastry flour.

What is “whole grain” anyway?
Since we’ve started selling The Mill’s flour, we frequently get the question — is it whole grain? Our answer is a resounding Yes! In fact, this is as whole grain as it gets. The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines “whole grain” as grain that contains the entire grain kernel — the bran, endosperm, and germ.

The flour you buy at the local grocery store is most likely refined — that is — the bran and germ has been removed, as well as well as dietary fiber, iron and many B vitamins. Refined grains are then “enriched,” a process where the nutrients are added back in.

With The Mill at Anselma’s flour — what you see is what you get — we pour wheat into the hopper, and it is ground and sifted — you end up with all the nutrients you started with! Because the germ is still present, we recommend that you store your flour in the freezer to keep it fresh.

What is the difference between unbleached and bleached flour?
Unbleached flour, like that ground at the Mill at Anselma, does not have any additives and is creamy in color when first ground. Flour naturally “bleaches” and becomes whiter when allowed to age for approximately three to four weeks. This aging process gives dough its elasticity during gluten formation. The Mill at Anselma’s flour is stored in a freezer to promote aging and to mitigate rancidity.

Bleached flour uses a bleaching agent to speed up the natural aging process. Most commercial mills use potassium bromate or chlorine to bleach flour. Cake flours actually benefit from bleaching as it enables the wheat starches to absorb more water, resulting in moister cakes.

Sources: The Mill at Anselma’s Miller’s Guide; Fact Sheet, Lehi Roller Mills, Salt Lake City, Utah